Black History Month: Three Digital Archives You Oughta Know

Black History Month: Three Digital Archives You Oughta Know
1950s Los Angeles. Photo by Henry Adams.

Black History Month: Three Digital Archives You Oughta Know

Black Film Archive

Created by Maya S. Cade, Black Film Archive is a living register of Black films. In its current iteration, it showcases Black films made from 1915 to 1979 currently streaming. For Black History Month, the archive has curated 28 films for 28 days to chart Black contributions to cinematic history.

“This selection is a place to start, find yourself in, retreat to, and rediscover gems,” said Black Film Archive.

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Black History Month: Three Digital Archives You Oughta Know

Black Beauty Archives

Curated from the hearts and minds of Black women, Black Beauty Archives encompasses the history of the past, documents the present while imagining the future.

Collections and objects include rare vintage beauty ads, magazines, press photos, stamps, cosmetics, wigs, and beauty tools. In addition, Exclusive oral histories from beauty professionals and historians are added to their collection on a bi-monthly basis.

“Our mission is to preserve, document and celebrate the history of Black Beauty culture,” said Black Beauty Archives.

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Black History Month: Three Digital Archives You Oughta Know
Courtesy photo.

Black Archives

Founded in 2015, by Renata Cherlise, Black Archives is a multimedia platform that brings a spotlight to the Black experience. Through an evolving visual exploration, Black Archives provides accessibility to a Black past, present, and future.

“Going beyond the norm, its lens examines the nuance of Black life: alive and ever-vibrant to both the everyday and iconic — providing insight and inspiration to those seeking to understand the legacies that preceded their own,” said Black Archives.

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Sarafinasaid: I love all of these archives. Each is so well done and incredibly inspiring. Make sure to follow them on Instagram to get a dose of Black history each and every day. Also, the thing I admire most about these is they’re not just a capsule of the Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, the Lena Horne’s or the Sidney Poitier’s, but everyday Black folks. 

People who have never received recognition — over the years, decades, and centuries since the invention of the African American — for their contributions to not just Black life but to the American fabric and all that makes this country unique.

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